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Monthly Archives: December 2016

7 Best Healthy Food in The World

Almonds

Almonds are a rich source of fiber, protein, heart-healthy fat, antioxidants and vitamins and minerals, making them a one-stop food. “[They make] a great snack but watch your portion size as almonds are high in calories,” warns Johnson. “Stick to no more than one ounce.” That’s 23 whole, shelled nuts. While the monounsaturated fat works to lower LDL cholesterol, their significant dose of vitamin E provides antioxidant power. What’s more, a quarter-cup of almonds has about 100 milligrams of magnesium (about 25 percent of a daily allowance), which promotes vascular and heart health, and 257 milligrams of potassium, which helps prevent high blood pressure. These benefits also have a track record in real-world scenarios: in five longitudinal cohort studies, including the Iowa Women Health Study and the Nurses’ Study, researchers found that replacing some portion of carbohydrate with nuts like almonds led to a heart disease risk reduction of 30 percent. And in a study in the journalMetabolism, researchers found that eating almonds along with a high glycemic index food (such as white bread, potatoes or sweets) at breakfast significantly lowered the overall glycemic index of the meal by helping to modulate the postprandial blood sugar rise.

Apples

Apples are an “excellent source of pectin, a soluble fiber that can lower blood cholesterol,” says Wixom. The fruit is also high in fiber and its peel contains something called ursolic acid, which has been shown in recent studies to lower the incidence of obesity. “Apples also contain quercetin, which has anti-inflammatory properties and can help in preventing respiratory problems,” Heather Bauer tells The Huffington Post. “Research shows that pregnant women who incorporated apples into their daily diet were less likely to give birth to a child with asthma.”

Artichoke Hearts

These small greenish-yellow veggies are jam-packed with fiber — 12 grams per cup, in fact. And a diet sufficient in fiber helps to promote healthy weight and cholesterol levels — and digestive health. But what’s more, a 2006 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that artichoke hearts had the highest antioxidant density of any vegetable, beating out such well-known antioxidant powerhouses as blueberries, dark chocolate and grapes.

Avocado

Packed with heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat that help people feel satiated, avocados are also rich sources of vitamin C, E, potassium, and lutein. And, points out Politi, when paired with salsa or salad, the monounsaturated fat helps us better absorb carotenoids, lycopene and beta-carotene — an important class of antioxidants found in many vegetables that help to protect against everything from cancer to eye health problems to heart disease. Early research has also found that the fruit could play a role in inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer cells.

Beets

“The dark red color indicates the powerful phytonutrient package of beets,” Diekman tells The Huffington Post. Indeed beets are rich in betalains, such as betanin and vulgaxanthin, that give them their pigment and also have anti-inflammation and antioxidant properties. Beyond that, beets contain significant amounts of folate, vitamin C, B6, iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, zinc, niacin, riboflavin and thiamine.

Beans

Thanks to a certain gross-out childhood rhyme, everyone knows that beans are good for your heart thanks to a high fiber content. Their fiberous quality also makes them protective against certain cancers and a top-rated food for diabetics, per the American Diabetes Association. And when combined with a grain, they comprise a high-quality vegetarian source of complete protein. Beans are an excellent dietary source of folate and also have high levels of iron, potassium and magnesium, according to Wixom, which help with bone health and blood pressure levels.

Bell Peppers

The peppers are “loaded with vitamin C,” says Joy Bauer. But unlike many other sources of the nutrient, bell peppers are relatively low in sugar, while also providing fiber and several antioxidants from the carotenoid class (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin). Carotenoids improve eye health, and are associated with areduction in cancer risk and a lower risk of cardiovascular-related death. And at least one study found that they can make you appear more beautiful.

Summer Hair Problems, Solved

If only summer hair were as easy as those magazines would have you believe!

Instead of “beachy waves” we’re left with greasy, frizzy, brittle strands that have seen far healthier days.

Luckily, there are easy and natural ways to tame your tresses. Here are some of the most common hair problems you’re likely to encounter this season, and how to fix them.

Chlorine Damage

It’s not just an old wives’ tale — too much time in the pool really can change the color of your locks, especially if they’re very light, Jessica Wu, M.D., author of “Feed Your Face” tells The Huffington Post.

But it’s not due to the chlorine. Instead, it’s likely because of copper lurking in poolswhere the chemical balance isn’t quite right, according to WebMD. “The chlorine molecules get trapped in the hair and oxidize the metals found in trace amounts in the water,” Jessica J. Krant, M.D., board-certified dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, writes to HuffPost in an email. “It’s the oxidized copper that is actually the cause of the green color.”

Chlorine can still damage hair, though. “The outer layers of the cuticle of the hair — which are like shingles on a roof — start to lift up,” says Wu. “When the outer layers lift up, then [chlorinated] water can get into the center of the hair and make your hair more brittle.” Swimmers may find their hair breaks more easily in the summer, especially if it’s dyed or straightened, she says.

Luckily, there are a few simple ways to prevent the damage. The easiest can be done anywhere — just rinse your hair under tap water before taking the plunge. “Plain water binds to the hair, making it harder for chlorine to get to it,” says Wu. A leave-in conditioner will have a similar effect, and can be a good pre-pool option as well. A weekly hair mask can help repair the damage and seal the cuticle, she says.

The American Academy of Dermatology also recommends wearing a swim cap and washing with shampoo and conditioner specifically formulated for swimmers to replace lost moisture.

Grease

We’ve all had those summer days when a daily shower just doesn’t seem like enough. And yet we’ve also heard about how you don’t need to — and maybe shouldn’t —wash your hair all that often.

But during the summer, all bets are off. “I tell people you should wash more frequently in the summer,” says Wu, and not just because of all the chlorine and salt water. “Those of us with long hair, it touches our back, and the sunscreen on our back and shoulders can come off onto the hair making it dirtier, faster.” If you’re noticing an oilier-than-usual scalp, feel free to lather up.

Sun Damage

The same UV rays that damage your skin without proper protection can hurt your hair, too, says Wu. The sun breaks down the bonds that make the keratin of the hair strong, she explains, leading to weaker strands and fading color. Just like covering up your skin can help prevent sun damage, wearing a hat can help save your hair.

A number of hair products that boast UV protection may also work, as long as you’re thorough in your application, she says. “Work it through like you’re working in a conditioner so as many strands as possible are coated.”

Sunburn

While you’re protecting your hair from the sun, don’t forget about your scalp. During skin exams, Wu notices “very striking” differences between the skin on patients’ hair parts and the skin on the rest of their scalps. If you often wear your hair in the same position, be sure to use sunscreen on the part, she says. And if you pull your hair back in the summer, apply sunscreen all the way up to your hairline — you may miss vulnerable skin that you’re not usually exposing.

“Using shampoos and products with antioxidant ingredients such as soy, green tea or vitamin C can sometimes be helpful” in protecting “that part of you that’s closest to the sun,” writes Krant, who is also the founder of Art of Dermatology in New York City. And if you do happen to do a little damage, cover up as soon as possible to avoid further sun, then use cool water in the shower and normal sunburn soothers like aloe, she says.

Frizz

Anyone with any wave or curl to her hair has spent her fair share of time fighting frizz. In the summer, thanks to the high temps and oppressive humidity, flyaway strands increase in size. “The generally smooth cuticle covering the shaft of healthy hair gets disrupted when the hair shaft absorbs moisture from the air, breaking some of the chemical bonds that keep the hair straight and roughing up the cuticle, taking away shine and smoothness,” writes Krant.

If you’re all too familiar, stay away from heavy products, says Wu, and look instead for an anti-frizz serum or spray. Krant recommends products with the moisturizer dimethicone — silicone-based products can also help smooth down the cuticle, according to Ladies Home Journal.

Split Ends

UV rays aren’t the only thing that can break summer strands. High temperatures can take their toll on the bonds that make hair strong as well, says Wu. While the temps won’t be quite as high as the heat of your blow dryer, writes Krant, the heat can still suck the moisture out of your locks and lead to breakage. To ease the brittleness, Wu suggests a heavier treatment like Moroccan oil.

Keep in mind, however, that according to Krant, once hair is outside the scalp, what’s done is done. “True damage can never really be reversed, only cosmetically improved until that part of the hair grows out and can be cut off,” she writes. Products can “temporarily ‘glue'” split ends back together, but “the best bet may be a little trim to freshen up,” she writes.

5 Tips to Protect Your Skin

You need to protect your skin because of the vital role it has protecting your body. Skin care doesn’t have to be complicated or time-consuming, and can quickly become second nature, like brushing your teeth.

These five skin protection tips can keep your skin looking and feeling great, by guarding against a slew of skin woes, from chapped skin to prematurely aging to skin cancer.

1. Limit Sun Exposure

You’ve heard the message a zillion times, and there’s good reason for that unrelenting repetition. Ultraviolet rays emitted by the sun cause many types of skin damage:

  • Skin cancer
  • Wrinkles
  • Freckles
  • Age spots
  • Discolorations
  • Benign growths

Using skin care products that offer ultraviolet protection is one of the best ways to help keep your skin looking fresh and youthful:

  • Use sunscreen every day and reapply regularly whenever you’re outdoors for extended periods.
  • Cover skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, pants, and wide-brimmed hats.
  • Stay indoors when the sun is at its most intense, usually between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Keep in mind that tanning beds are just as harmful as direct sunlight, as they also emit ultraviolet rays.

2. Stay Hydrated

Keeping your skin moist is essential to skin protection. Skin that is properly hydrated retains pliability and prevents chapped skin or scaly, flaky skin:

  • Drink lots of water. This is key to hydrating your skin.
  • Use the right moisturizing cream or lotion for your skin type and apply it right after drying off from your bath or shower. Avoid products that contain sodium lauryl sulfate, as this ingredient removes natural oils needed by your skin.
  • Take warm (not hot) showers or baths, and limit them to between 5 and 10 minutes. It seems counterintuitive, but exposure to water actually dries out your skin. If dry skin persists, consider cutting back on the number of baths you take.

3. Take Health Precautions

Cold sores are caused by a viral infection of the skin bordering the lips, while bacteria can contribute to acne and other skin conditions. Practicing skin protection means paying close attention to what touches your skin, to lower your chances of exposure to germs:

  • Don’t share any personal items, such as lip balms or toothbrushes.
  • Don’t share drinks with other people.
  • Avoid touching your face with your fingers or with objects like telephone receivers that have been used by others.

4. Use Gentle Skin Care

Washing your face is important to remove dirt, oils, germs, and dead cells. However, scrubbing your face causes irritation that can lead to chapped skin that, in turn, can leave skin vulnerable. For best results, you should:

  • Wash your face twice daily with warm water and a mild cleanser.
  • Gently massage your face with a washcloth, using a circular motion.
  • Rinse thoroughly after washing to remove all soap and debris.
  • Pat your skin dry — don’t rub — then apply your facial moisturizer.

5. Know Your Skin

Pay attention to odd freckles, moles, and growths on your skin, and consult your doctor if you notice any changes. For example, a change in a mole can indicate potential skin cancer. Be sure to treat any cuts that may occur to prevent infection. Other skin conditions that merit a dermatologist visit include frequent acne, inflamed or irritated dry skin, and skin rashes and irritations that don’t go away, as these could be signs of one of the many types of dermatitis, or skin inflammation.

With proper skin care to pamper skin from the outside and with a good diet to nourish from within, skin protection comes down to a few simple steps. But should you ever notice any problems, get medical attention to resolve them quickly and avoid putting your skin at risk.

Skin and Beauty Resources

The AAD is an association of practicing dermatologists that provides medical information and skin care education to the public. The AAD’s main Web site contains information on:

A related Web site, SkinCarePhysicians.com was created by the AAD to help patients find out more information about skin cancer and other skin conditions, as well as information about cosmetic procedures and treatments.

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

847-956-0900

The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery membership consists of dermatologic surgeons who diagnose and treat skin cancer and revitalize aging, environmentally damaged skin. Its Web site contains a variety of consumer information, including:

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

847-228-9900

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the society of board-certified plastic surgeons. Its Web site contains a large database of public education information on plastic surgery, including details on:

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

877-226-4267

Part of the National Institutes of Health, NIAMS supports research initiatives looking into the causes, treatment, and prevention of skin diseases, as well as arthritis and musculoskeletal diseases. The NIAMS Information Clearinghouse provides a wealth of health information, including information on various skin diseases and their treatments.

Skin and Beauty Books

The Beauty Bible: The Ultimate Guide to Smart Beauty by Paula Begoun (Beginning Press; 2002). A comprehensive resource for people looking for straight answers about beauty and cosmetic products, treatments, and procedures. Begoun provides easy-to-read information that will help you make more informed skin care and beauty decisions.

Secrets of Great Skin: The Definitive Guide to Anti-Aging Skin Care by David J. Goldberg, MD and Eva M. Herriott, PhD (Innova Publishing, 2005). This book covers strategies for preventing and reducing signs of aging on your skin. Tips include how to reduce stress and other factors that lead to premature aging, the best nutrition for healthy skin, optimal skin care for younger-looking skin, and treatments that can revitalize aging skin. Dr. Goldberg is a board-certified dermatologist and director of laser research at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

Skin Sense! A Dermatologist’s Guide to Skin and Facial Care by Stephen M. Schleicher, MD (iUniverse, Inc., 2004). Written by a leading dermatologist with more than 20 years of clinical experience, this book contains information on the importance of nutrition in skin care; early detection of skin cancer; management of psoriasis, eczema, and other skin conditions; tips on achieving a healthy complexion; and the latest anti-aging treatments. This is a valuable resource for people who are concerned about the health of their skin.